Working Past 65 | Medicare Made Clear

You first become eligible to enroll in Medicare around age 65. But if you plan to keep working or you have employer health coverage through a spouse, you have some options to consider when signing up for Medicare. Here you’ll find the resources and tools you need to help learn about your Medicare enrollment choices and to make confident decisions about getting Medicare.

Do I Have to Get Medicare With Employer Coverage?

Find out what your Medicare enrollment choices are by answering a few questions below.

Q.

Do you currently receive Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board Benefits? 

Q.

Is your health insurance through your spouse’s employer? 

Q.

Does the employer you get your health insurance from have 20 or more employees?

A.

Because you’re receiving Social Security / Railroad Retirement Board benefits, you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A & B when you turn 65. And since your employer has fewer than 20 employees, you cannot delay Medicare enrollment without financial penalties.

A.

Because you’re receiving Social Security / Railroad Retirement Board benefits, you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A & B when you turn 65. However, since your employer has 20 or more employees, you may be able to delay enrollment if you have creditable drug coverage!

A.

Because you’re receiving Social Security / Railroad Retirement Board benefits, you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A & B when you turn 65. However, because your coverage comes from your spouse’s employer, you may have options: delay or enroll. Your spouse’s employer may require you to enroll in Medicare in order to keep the employer coverage. Talk with the employer’s benefits administrator to know your options.

A.

You will need to enroll yourself in Medicare when you become eligible. And since your employer has fewer than 20 employees, you cannot delay Medicare enrollment without financial penalties.

A.

Because your employer has 20 or more employees, you may be able to delay enrolling if you have creditable drug coverage! We’d suggest signing up for this free email and webinar series to learn more about what you can do with Medicare when working past 65.

A.

Your spouse’s employer may have rules for covered dependents that could require you to enroll in Medicare, or depending on the size of the employer, you may be able to delay. Talk with the employer’s benefits administrator to know your options.

If an employer has 20 or more employees, generally you can choose to delay Medicare enrollment, drop your employer coverage for Medicare, or have both Medicare and employer coverage.

If an employer has fewer than 20 employees, generally you will need to enroll in Medicare during your Initial Enrollment Period.

If you have health coverage through a spouse’s employer, you may be able to delay or you may need to enroll at age 65. You can have both Medicare and the employer coverage. What you can do will depend on the employer’s rules.

Get Your Medicare When Working Past 65 Guide & Webinar Access

You’ll get timely emails with important information to help you navigate your Medicare enrollment journey when working past 65. In this email series, you’ll receive a helpful PDF guide, exclusive access to six webinars and learn about Medicare basics, enrollment, plan options and more.

Enter Your Information

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Why do we need this information The above fields are required.Your birthdate will be used to determine your Initial Enrollment Period dates and to send you the most timely and relevant information for your situation.

By providing your email address, you are agreeing to receive information and product offers.

Thank you.

Your Medicare Made Clear When Working Past 65 guide — to help you quickly know your Medicare enrollment options — will arrive in your inbox soon. Enjoy!

Enrolling in Medicare When Working Past 65

Even if you plan to keep working, you still have a 7-month Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) when you turn 65. If an employer has fewer than 20 employees or your spouse’s employer requires you to get Medicare to remain on their plan as a dependent, you will need to enroll during your IEP to avoid late enrollment penalties. You may also decide enrolling in Medicare is your best choice even if you can delay, and in this case, enrolling during your IEP is a good idea.

Learn about my Initial Enrollment Period & Medicare choices


Your Medicare Special Enrollment Period

When you retire or lose your employer coverage, you will have an 8-month Special Enrollment Period in which to enroll in Medicare. You will have up to 8 months to enroll in Parts A and/or B, but only the first two months to enroll in Parts C and/or D.

Find your Special Enrollment Period dates


Working Past 65 with Medicare FAQs

 You can have Medicare and employer coverage as well as other types of coverage such as COBRA, TRICARE, CHAMPVA, VA and FEHB. How Medicare works with each of these varies.

What Happens When I Retire?

It’s best to understand what your options are once you retire. The first step is to find out if you can keep the coverage you have now when you retire, and whether or not it can be combined with Original Medicare (Parts A and B) coverage. If you have group retiree health coverage, you’ll need to contact the plan’s benefits administrator to learn about how the coverage works with Medicare and what you need to do.